nonviolence training civil rights movement

some training was in classic gandhian nonviolence, learning why (and to some degree, how) to peacefully face and defuse hatred and violence with courage and compassion. the main purpose of training in philosophical nonviolence was to shape the individual person’s attitude and mental response to crises and violence. on the other hand, the main purpose of training in tactical nonniolence was to learn the practical techniques of participating in, organizing, and leading, nonviolent direct action demonstrations, — and how to protect yourself from being maimed or killed while doing so. in the early years of the freedom movement, the late 50s and early 60s, philosophic training predominated, but by the time i became active in 1963 most of the training i was involved in was tactical rather than philosophical.




and there were good reasons why such training was necessary: the notes from a training session i ran in late ’63, listed the instances of violence that had been inflicted on local demonstrators in that area during the previous year: those abuses were endured civil rights demonstrators in los angeles, california in 1963, — not in georgia, lousiana, mississippi, or alabama. and the fact is that even today there are more effective and less effective ways to organize, lead, and participate in protest; and that direct action has an element of craft to it that can — and should — be learned. in terms of political and moral effectiveness, group singing is to group chanting, as an elephant is to a mouse. moreover, the kind of singing that (trained) protesters do as an act of solidarity in the face of hatred and danger is very different from performance singing done on stage or in school. one of the reasons that the singing on modern mass marches is so pathetic and demoralizing is that no one’s been doing any training or practice.

some training was in classic gandhian nonviolence, learning why (and to some degree, how) to peacefully face and the education and training methodology and philosophy developed during the u.s. civil rights movement of the 1950s the success of the movement for african american civil rights across the south in the 1960s has largely been credited, nonviolent protest training, nonviolent protest training, why was nonviolence effective in the civil rights movement, civil rights protest training, violence vs nonviolence civil rights movement. [u’ Historically, nonviolence training was used extensively during the civil rights movement, in Gandhi\’s campaigns in India against the British, and in recent years in the struggles against nuclear technology, against U.S. policy in Central America and Southern Africa and for the rights of farm workers, women and people … and others lectured on nonviolence. Singing and prayer strengthened community spirit and the nonviolent discipline. As civil disobedience became a crucial part of the civil rights movement, training included role plays and signing a pledge to remain nonviolent.

at the heart of the u.s. civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s was the use of nonviolent direct-action protest, principles of nonviolence could be effective in the civil rights movement. training and role-playing in nonviolent techniques were part of the preparation for core’s original may 4 freedom ride. the civil rights movement in tennessee and elsewhere in the nation emphasized protest, but non-violent protest,, civil rights movement training, nonviolent resistance training, examples of nonviolent protest used in the civil rights movement, violence in the civil rights movement

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